STAG: Man’s Own Magazine (Summer 1946)

Earlier, I had read and reported on the first issue of Stag. Now, we return, to learn that the magazine is here to stay, this time additionally filled-out with advertisements. What? oh yes, the last issue (that being the premier edition) featured NO ADS!!!

STAG: Man’s Own Magazine (Vol 1 # 2, Summer 1946) was published by Winter Bros. Press Ltd., and proclaims now to be published quarterly.

  • Bevis Winter (Editorial Manager)
  • Brett Ogilvie (Associate Editor)
  • J. Robert Breen (American Editor)

Stag 2

Again, it is jam-packed with stock-photos of Hollywood actresses in various poses.

  • Page 13 – unidentified lady
  • Page 33 – Marie McDonald
  • Page 34 – Vivian Austin
  • Page 35 – Leslie Brooks
  • Page 36 – Evelyn Keyes
  • Page 43 – Jane Russell
  • Page 44 – Paulette Goddard
  • Page 66 – Rita Hayworth

Once more, it is filled with an assortment of masculine articles dealing in sports, men’s dress code, household, automobiles, etc., along with cartoons and joke-snippets interspersed by artists such as Arthur Potts (3 ), John J. Walter, and others.

The quality of the writers and fiction drops off in this issue (the former contained heavy-hitters Gerald Kersh and Denys Val Baker). This edition features:

  • Ralph L. Finn – What the Butler Saw (pages 8-11)
    The late Judge Mannering died falling down a staircase. Nobody really laments his passing. Mannering was hard on local drunkards, stamping them with hefty fines or imprisonment. But, when the butler learns that Mannering is a hypocrite, he pushes the intoxicated judge down the steps…to his death!
  • Michael Hervey – Grandstand Charlie (pages 17-20)
    Charlie does nothing without an audience. But when he takes one audience endeavor on too many… Let’s just say that he witnesses a person drowning in the ocean and while diving in, he breaks his own neck. Why dive in? He believed the water deeper than it was. The person drowning? A midget, in two feet of water.
  • Sylvester McNeil – Strained Relations (pages 24-25)
    A odd story involving a penniless man applying to marry a rich man’s daughter, whom he claims, quite honestly, to love. The father laughs off the whole matter. It’s unclear to me just what is implied, unless he is not the first man to approach the father for her hand in marriage, before going into the Air Force.
  • Dennis Wynne – Love Me, Love My Juke-Box (pages 41-42)
    A young man in love pushes his piano through town and under the window of the young lady he loves, in order to satisfy her desire to be musically serenaded. Sadly, she despises pianists!
  • Brett Ogilvie – Keep Your Hair On (pages 45-50)
    A slightly weird tale involving a man’s desire to grow hair on his head. After various quack treatments, oils, salve, lotions, etc., he discusses the issue with his friend. Said friend learns of a doctor (of sorts) claiming to have discovered a sensational cure. However, he hasn’t had anyone to 100% try it on. Applying it to the hairless-one, the next day, he becomes covered head-to-toe in hair. Despite shaving it throughout the day, it keeps quickly re-growing. Eventually, they re-approach the “doctor,” whom sprays weed-killer all over the man! The next morning the pair return, and he is again covered in hair! The spray failed. The friend slowly rolls up his sleeves, and suggests, at the very least, a full refund….
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STAG: Man’s Own Magazine (Summer 1946)

STAG : Man’s Own Magazine (Spring 1946)

The second world war is over. And out of those ashes arose a plethora of new publications, borne from the minds of civilians and veterans alike. STAG: Man’s Own Magazine (Vol 1 # 1, Spring [March] 1946) was edited by Bevis Winter, and claimed to be exclusively for “men.” The opening pages are written and signed by the editor, welcoming readers out of the hell of war to the progress of tomorrow.

Stag 1

It’s also littered with stock-photos of Hollywood actresses in various poses.

  • Page 2 – Cyd Charisse
  • Page 27 – Jean Kent
  • Page 28 – Margaret Lockwood
  • Page 32 – Marilyn Maxwell
  • Page 37 – Phyllis Calvert
  • Page 41 – Ava Gardner
  • Page 42 – Frances Rafferty
  • Page 67 – Patricia Roc

An assortment of articles aimed at men include historical male figures, sports, men’s dress code, household, automobiles, etc. Then there are the usual cartoon and comic joke-snippets interspersed by artists such as “Merlin,” Geoffrey Wadlow, and a pair of others.

The real gems are the fiction stories, most of which are supplied by quality writers.

  • Ralph L. Finn – A Dame with a Difference (pages 7-11)
    A man jaded on women finds the woman of his dreams and they romance each other to pieces but he bails out on her when marriage is brought into the equation.
  • Hervey Elliot Scott – He Shot a Fat Lady (pages 16-20)
    A humorous circus murder story, involving the presumed murder of the Four Ton Florrie by the India-rubber Man. The police try him for murder, he is convicted, but, when they attempt to exact vengeance in the name of the law, bullets bounce off him, hanging him only stretches his neck, electrocution fails, etc. You get the idea. We then are informed that the Fat Lady is not dead! She merely was in a coma due to the folds of her fat, where the bullet had lodged.
  • Dennis Wynne – And the Blood Coursed Freely (pages 21-26)
    The story involves a man reliving his youthful days through a variety of action-filled silly scenarios; finding a beautiful woman, fighting and losing her. Purely a humorous tale.
  • Denys Val Baker – Water (pages 49-51)
    Baker delves deep into the sinister fascination a hydrophobic deals with on a regular, daily basis, in all forms and fears.
  • Gerald Kersh – Vision of a Lost Child (pages 55-58)
    A man grows up re-living a nightmarish tragedy from childhood in his dreams and each time he sleeps, he sinks deeper and deeper in mud. Believing that when the mud succeeds in creeping over him that he will die, he puts off sleep for over a week and seeks the aid of a psychologist. In the end, he falls asleep, and the mud wins. A deep, dark story by a clever writer of weird stories.
  • Brett Ogilvie – The Abnormal Talent (pages 62-66)
    A painter’s works-of-art come to life upon completion, only, he desires to exit the business lest he go insane. When asked by a friend to draw a gun, he performs the task. It is used against him. Thus dying, all his creations-come-to-life immediately vanish. However, the dead artist returns to life, sans his former ability! A entrancingly humorous fantasy.
STAG : Man’s Own Magazine (Spring 1946)